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Aaron M.

2
Level 2 Contributor
Shanghai, China

Contributor Level

Total Points
1,415

About Me

I am a dating site investigator. See my dating site report, "True Confessions" = payhip.com/b/DwJg

Interests

exposing fraudulent dating sites

9 Reviews by Aaron

428 Views
1/27/21

This is a review that is difficult to write. For the past twenty years, I did all my banking with PNC. I took out car loans. I have a home equity loan. I have one credit card and two debit cards. Everything has been humming. I have been supremely happy with the professionalism and the humanity of PNC personnel.
But, as a result of the past two weeks, I am bitterly disappointed. PNC put me into a precarious situation and, even after pleading on my part, the higher management reps turned a deaf ear. I will tell you my story and let you decide what you want to do about it.

~~~~~How my #1 debit card got cancelled
It all started on 15 Jan 2021. PNC sent me an email alerting me to a suspicious charge that was turned down by my #1 debit card. I called the number given to me and together we decided that the charge was not initiated by me. Hence, because my card #1 might be compromised, I agreed to cancel it and to rely upon debit card #2.
Four days later, I used card #2 for an online purchase of $1 for a trial news service. My card was declined. I called "customer service for credit cards" and Sophie took my call. What she discovered hit me hard. "Your debit card [#2] was cancelled on 01 Dec 2020 because it was not being used."
"I don't understand this. I gave this debit card to my wife in order to allow her to have access to monies in the case of an emergency. Since, in the past four months, no emergency arose, she had no cause to use it."
Sophie: "That makes sense to me."
"What I don't understand is why PNC cancelled my card #2 without consulting with me and without notifying me."
Sophie: "This was due to a software transaction whereby inactive cards are automatically cancelled."
"I can't believe this. This automatic cancellation has caused me great harm. I am here in Shanghai without a debit card that allows me to use a Chinese ATM to convert and withdraw the local currency. I have been doing this for over four years. I routinely convert and withdraw more than $1000 every month from my Social Security direct deposits. Now I am stranded without a working debit card. I am left without any source of monies to pay my rent, my groceries, my club fees, etc."
Sophie: "I see that you are hurting. What can I do to help?"
"I need you to send me a new debit card by federal express [overnight service]. Send it to my address on record. This should get it to me in 2 to 4 days tops."
Sophie agreed to do this. She gave me a reference number, and I hung up with the satisfaction that "while PNC got me into a mess by cancelling my debit card #2 without notifying me, now Sophie assured me that they would correct their machine ERROR by going the extra mile to rush a new card to me." I slept well that night.
~~~~~All seemed to be going well until a new PNC mail arrives
Three days later, I receive another PNC email saying that I need to contact them [letter shown in pic below]. Now I am talking with Stacy, a specialist in conflict resolution. "I am going to do everything I can by way of resolving your problem." When I describe my problem as described above, however, I notice that Stacy is very clear that she is there "to help me" but that she is unwilling to say that PNC was at the root cause of my distressful situation when they cancelled card #2 without notifying or consulting with me. I figure that she is highly trained and, as a consequence, highly cautious and wants to prevent a possible lawsuit in the future.
Then 15 minutes are used to ascertain that I am the true owner of the account and that I am not impersonating the true owner. Well and good. I like the fact that Stacy has been careful to protect my monies. But then I discover that Sophie did not send out a new debit card. Rather, she decided to bring Sophie on board and have her resolve my dispute with the bank. NOW I RECOGNIZE WHY STACY WAS SO CAUTIOUS IN NEVER ALLOWING THAT PNC DID ME A DISSERVICE WHEN THEY CANCELLED CARD #2.
~~~~~Now the tone of our exchanges gradually changes.
Stacy explains that to FedEx a card to me, "we need additional confirmation of your identity as the account holder." I express my puzzlement at this. "If PNC was willing to send a new card to me by surface mail, why does FedEx require additional identity confirmation when FedEx is used? What is the critical difference between these two cases?" In over ten minutes of polite give and take, I came to the conclusion that Stacy has no logical reason for an additional identity confirmation beyond "this is what PNC regulations require." So, in frustration, I decide to go ahead with "the process required for additional confirmation."
~~~~~Contents of the machine-generated and machine-corrected identity test
As it turns out the additional confirmation took 30 to 40 minutes. All in all, it consisted of ten multiple-choice questions regarding my former addresses, my former homes, my vehicles owned. Nothing is asked regarding former auto loans, home equity loans, former transaction with PNC. It's like someone had used one of the "public records research" software programs that gave them access to my history with homes and vehicles. Here is an illustrative question (constructed from memory):
Q5: Which of these dates (if any) represents the time period when I sold my home on Queenswood Dr.?
R1: August of 2011
R2: June of 2008
R3: May of 2015
R4: June of 1998
R5: None of the above
I immediately reply, "I never sold my Queenswood home. As part of a court ordered divorce settlement, I signed over the home registered in my name to my former wife." Tracy responds: "I don't know if that interpretation is true or false."
"You mean that you don't ever know which of the five responses is correct?"
Tracy: "That's right. All I am doing is reading the multiple-choice questions given to me and recording your responses. Only at the end will the software decide whether you have passed or failed."
Now I become irritated. "I frankly don't know whether I should choose NONE OF THE ABOVE because I never sold my home or whether I should take the transfer of ownership as the real question."
Tracy: "I can't help you with this. But the clock is running and it is quite possible that you will exceed the time allotted for this test."
"How much time is left?"
Tracy: "This I don't know."
~~~~~Now I see the INDIGNITY of this whole process.
It has now come down to making decisions as to the real intent of the question. I also have trouble, quite frankly, recalling the month and year that the transfer would have taken place. I cannot remember the date on our divorce settlement, and I cannot remember whether this was an item where my Ex was dragging her feet and deliberately stalling the implementation of the court order. So it has come down to being a memory test. Ask me the first names of my grandmothers. Ask me the make and year of my first car. These things I can answer. The question asked in this machine-generated test, I cannot answer. I choose R1 in order to beat the clock and to finish the memory exam in a timely fashion.
At the end, I ask, "What does the software say, did I pass or fail?"
Tracy: "It says that the test was invalidated because you exceeded the allotted time."
~~~~~My final outburst of indignation
"What!? This is absurd. First I have to suffer the indignity of discovering that my debit card #2 was cancelled by a software program that is not accountable and has no link to "customer service." Next, I have to suffer the indignity of being told that Sophie never followed through on our agreement. Third, I have to suffer the indignity of having a 30 to 40 minute software program inform me that I have FAILED and that it cannot be repeated or challenged due it its ERRORS."
Then I proceeded to tell Stacy that I could send her a copy of my passport as a mark of my true identity. I could tell her the names and ages and locations of my brothers and sisters. But no! Stacy says, "This is not part of the identity test designed for this purpose. You failed that test. My hands are tied."
~~~~~A final appeal to the fine tradition of customer service at PNC
Then, as a last ditch effort, I explained to Stacy the tradition of "customer service" at PNC. I deliberately told her that "customer safety" and "customer service" are conjoined twins. Neither side can be allowed to suffocate the other. "Surely you can allow that PNC software has become an unanticipated cause for suffering on two distinct occasions. So you decide that software cannot be allowed to stifle customer service. You decide to go the extra mile to remedy that suffering. The Bank depends upon you. I depend upon. So you faithfully FedEx the debit card I urgently need."
Then Stacy said, "I would be afraid of losing my job if I ignored the software test that is required."
~~~~~In the end, Stacy is a broken human being
At that moment, I felt sorry for Stacy. She was afraid to think outside the box. She had been indoctrinated by her trainers to believe that her personal judgment was not to be trusted. I could be a con-artist, after all. It made no difference that a debit card could be sent out by surface mail but not by FedEx. It made no difference that the debit card, in either case, would be sent to my address in Shanghai that has not changed for four years. No amount of simple common sense could penetrate her indoctrination. No amount of suffering on my part could give her second thoughts. No amount of suffering on my part could penetrate the blind obedience that she had to give to the regs. Customer service be damned! "I'm afraid of losing my job."
I was completely silent for three to four full minutes. These were the sad thoughts I was having. Stacy's humanity had been curtailed and crushed by a system that prides itself on infallible identity tests administrated by a machine. She is afraid to think or do otherwise. She has a ready answer for every contingency. I am just a thorn in her side. I am a clever prevaricator and manipulator.
After we hung up, I can imagine Stacy consoling herself, "The software saved the Bank. The software put him in his place. If you don't follow the regs faithfully, you can't survive here!"
Sincerely,
Aaron Milavec

PS: I too am a broken human being. But I am aware of my brokenness and am actively working alone and with others to heal my brokenness.
PPS: I tried to relate the events and to reconstruct the dialogue as honestly as I was able.

1/14/21

Mark Edwards has edited the scam produced by Ryan Taylor for his own purposes:

Ryan Taylor makes some impressive claims:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ad content~~~~~~~~~~~~
This crazy 45 Year-old geography teacher believed he could change the energy world... and many people are saying he did just that...
He discovered breakthrough research from M. I. T. That had been suppressed by the energy industry... and built upon it to craft an incredible innovation in alternative energy- that can power an entire house - and save everyday folks shocking amounts of money...
Power companies are enraged about it... but normal citizens- couples, seniors, preppers, and people wanting to save lots of money on power bills- are ecstatic...
If you want to save money too AND increase your family's resiliency at the same time, its crucial you see the incredible video for yourself now!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ryan's 30-minute video tells an incredible story. His family is caught in a power outage. His children are cold and hungry. He goes to Home Depot to buy a gasoline powered generator. Then he meets someone who explains how, for only $106, he could buy the parts for constructing a marvelously simple system (pictured as shown) that will power his home now and for months to come without paying a cent to the power company. Toward the end of the video, he explains how he has put together step by step instructions that would allow you to duplicate his system and to provide free electrical power to your home indefinitely.
Does this seem too wonderful to be true? It sure does. That because Ryan is playing you for a sucker and that the system he built never worked as he said it did.
Did I actually pay out the $45 to get his book and to build the free electrical generator for myself? No way. I didn't need to. I have a degree in physics and have thirty years working with electrical circuits. By virtue of the Law of the Conservation of Energy, Ryan's system cannot produce more electrical energy than what he puts into it in the beginning. According to Ryan, his system was able to supply his home with electric power at a time when a storm had downed the power lines. In sum, his system (pictured as shown) was violating the Law of the Conservation of Energy. He was cheating the electrical company and he was cheating the laws of physics at the same time. What?
Let's imagine, for a moment, that Ryan's system does produce free electricity. In that case, I would expect that Ryan would reveal his dirty little secret to at least ten of his close drinking buddies. They would spend $106 to build their own system and never have to pay an electrical bill again. You can just bet that his drinking buddies would give him free beers as a sign of their gratitude. But, more importantly, his ten drinking buddies would surely tell ten members of their extended family about Ryan's marvelous discovery. Then we would have a hundred people off the electrical power grid. In just a few months, this number would be in the thousands. In a few years, the number would be well over a million. And the electrical power companies couldn't do anything about this. There is no law against creating free electricity for your home.
But this has not happened, has it? And why not? Because Ryan's dirty little secret is that his system never worked for him or for anyone else. What did work however is that the gullible guys who tried to reproduce his marvelous generator paid out $45 each. Ryan shows 140,000 hits on his site. Even if only 2% of his viewers actually forked over $45 for his step by step instructions, his total receipts would be $126,000. So, Ryan's system is marvelously working for him. He not only buys free beers for his drinking buddies, he is even thinking of retiring early and sending his children to Ivy League schools.

1/14/21

This is a spinoff of the following review that I just posted:

Ryan Taylor makes some impressive claims:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ad content~~~~~~~~~~~~
This crazy 45 Year-old geography teacher believed he could change the energy world... and many people are saying he did just that...
He discovered breakthrough research from M. I. T. That had been suppressed by the energy industry... and built upon it to craft an incredible innovation in alternative energy- that can power an entire house - and save everyday folks shocking amounts of money...
Power companies are enraged about it... but normal citizens- couples, seniors, preppers, and people wanting to save lots of money on power bills- are ecstatic...
If you want to save money too AND increase your family's resiliency at the same time, its crucial you see the incredible video for yourself now!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ryan's 30-minute video tells an incredible story. His family is caught in a power outage. His children are cold and hungry. He goes to Home Depot to buy a gasoline powered generator. Then he meets someone who explains how, for only $106, he could buy the parts for constructing a marvelously simple system (pictured as shown) that will power his home now and for months to come without paying a cent to the power company. Toward the end of the video, he explains how he has put together step by step instructions that would allow you to duplicate his system and to provide free electrical power to your home indefinitely.
Does this seem too wonderful to be true? It sure does. That because Ryan is playing you for a sucker and that the system he built never worked as he said it did.
Did I actually pay out the $45 to get his book and to build the free electrical generator for myself? No way. I didn't need to. I have a degree in physics and have thirty years working with electrical circuits. By virtue of the Law of the Conservation of Energy, Ryan's system cannot produce more electrical energy than what he puts into it in the beginning. According to Ryan, his system was able to supply his home with electric power at a time when a storm had downed the power lines. In sum, his system (pictured as shown) was violating the Law of the Conservation of Energy. He was cheating the electrical company and he was cheating the laws of physics at the same time. What?
Let's imagine, for a moment, that Ryan's system does produce free electricity. In that case, I would expect that Ryan would reveal his dirty little secret to at least ten of his close drinking buddies. They would spend $106 to build their own system and never have to pay an electrical bill again. You can just bet that his drinking buddies would give him free beers as a sign of their gratitude. But, more importantly, his ten drinking buddies would surely tell ten members of their extended family about Ryan's marvelous discovery. Then we would have a hundred people off the electrical power grid. In just a few months, this number would be in the thousands. In a few years, the number would be well over a million. And the electrical power companies couldn't do anything about this. There is no law against creating free electricity for your home.
But this has not happened, has it? And why not? Because Ryan's dirty little secret is that his system never worked for him or for anyone else. What did work however is that the gullible guys who tried to reproduce his marvelous generator paid out $45 each. Ryan shows 140,000 hits on his site. Even if only 2% of his viewers actually forked over $45 for his step by step instructions, his total receipts would be $126,000. So, Ryan's system is marvelously working for him. He not only buys free beers for his drinking buddies, he is even thinking of retiring early and sending his children to Ivy League schools.

1/9/21

Why did I choose mailgun.com?

I am a research theologian and watchdog for abusive claims of organized religions. I operate five sites. The most significant is ChurchonFire.net. In early December, I had 1200 registered users. I wanted to send out a Christmas card. I became aware that my website host (in Shanghai) had limits on the number of emails that could be sent out. After doing preliminary research, I choose mailgun.com for its ability to enable me to send out my emails responsibly and intelligently.

What was my experience in using mailgun.com?

ChurchonFire uses WordPress and the app Mailpoet to design and mail out emails. By 08 Dec 2020, I had designed a brief and attractive Christmas card. By 09 Dec 2020, I had mastered mailgun.com to the degree that I had the required SMTP and password that would permit my sending of 1200 greetings.

Then everything went haywire. The first sign that something was amiss is that I was unable to send a test email to *******@churchonfire.net. As a result, I tried to get technical help from mailgun.com by opening a service ticket. After spending over two hours, I finally discovered that service tickets are not available to free members. Nothing on the mailgun.com website indicates this. I had to find it out by looking through critical reviews of the site on an independent site.

10 Dec 2020, I discovered that all of my email accounts were frozen. I could not send or receive emails. My suspicion was that mailgun.com had something to do with this. After spending three fruitless hours trying to determine why my accounts were frozen, I sent a service ticket to my website provider, A2hosting.com.

A few days later, I received the reply that mailgun.com had rerouted all of my email services attached to ChurchonFire.net. I immediately tried to logon to my mailgun.com account. Now a two-step process had been put in place. Step One requires that I put in my name and password. I did this. Then Step Two was opened up telling me that a six-digit code was sent to *******@churchonfire.net. This was the Catch-22. I could not receive any of my emails sent to *******@churchonfire.net.

I desperately tried to make contact with someone at Mailgun.

I already knew that I could not open up a service ticket, so I tried their online help service. When I tried to use this service, however, I was informed that I had to open up my account by way of establishing my identity before sending them a help email. Since I could not complete Step Two, I was blocked from using this service.

After two weeks of growing frustration with my blocked emails, I remembered an early email received from Mailgun, Nick Lafferty | Growth Marketing Lead *******@mailgun.com that began like this:

Hey Aaron,
I'm pumped you signed up for Mailgun! I used Mailgun for years before I started working here, so I wanted to personally walk you through your first few days...

This email was like a lifeline of hope being thrown to a drowning man. Better yet, Nick had included his email! So I could finally communicate with someone inside the system that was capable and interested in helping me. I detailed all my frustrations and sent the email on 06 Jan 2021 using my Yahoo account.

Here is the reply I received 07 Jan 2021:

Hi Aaron,
Please submit a support ticket by emailing *******@mailgun.com. They are best equipped to assist you.
Nick

I replied as follows:

Nick,
You ask me to use *******@mailgun.com, but I already informed you:
I can't login to my account because I cannot receive my *******@churchonfire.net emails using your two-step process. I can't get online help for the same reason.
Bitterly disappointed,
Aaron

Nick ignored me. This left me super-frustrated. Here is what I sent:

Dear Nick Lafferty,
You are not reading me. I repeat:
I can't login to my account because I cannot receive my *******@churchonfire.net emails using your two-step process. I can't get online help for the same reason.
Cancel my account. Give me back full control over all my emails. Forward the emails that have been redirected since December 10th.
Aaron Milavec

The sad truth is that Nick continued to ignore me. He threw me a lifeline for one brief moment. Then he completely left me to drown in a system content to lock up my emails and to lock me out of my account with them.

It will not surprise you that I will never work with Mailgun again.

Bitterly disappointed,
Aaron

Tip for consumers:
After they take control of your email accounts, you won't be able to open your account with them or to get any professional help. Keep far away from Mailgun.

9/9/20

I am a dating site investigator. www.datingreviews.online provides a very positive review of LovingFeel.com. Unfortunately, however, LovingFeel.com is a total scam. See my review with sitejabber.com or go to http://www.churchonfire.net/dating-fraud-at-lovingfeel-com/

Aaron Milavec
True Confessions = payhip.com/b/DwJg

9/2/20

Lovingfeel.com promises to be an ideal platform enabling Western men to date Asian women.

LovingFeel.com profiles contain high-quality photos and videos. You are free to review profiles that include public images and personal details. Members must buy credits to view private pictures and videos.

Female members must get validation status which provides assurances to the men that the pics displayed and the profile data are scrupulously reliable. This validation is optional for male members. Having been burnt by web sites that feature profiles of women who are inactive or even dead, it was a relief for me to know about their validation procedures.

When I first set-up my profile, I received five invitations to chat and four emails within the next hour. In the days and weeks that followed, I received, on the average, eight new invitations to chat and four new emails every day. What I noticed immediately is the high quality of the email pics. Three out of four pics were the product of a professional studio. Each woman had between five and twelve pics. While the pics were very attractive, the profiles were thin and centered on standard biographical details. Room was given for a lengthy self-description, but I noticed that almost all the women avoided using this. The reason for this will soon become clear.

This dating site requires that men purchase credits to participate. 10 credits for an initial email; 25 for subsequent emails. Chatroom participation is computed at 2 credits per minute. Initially men receive 20 credits free. From that point onward, one has to pay roughly 1 rmb for every credit. Women, in contrast, have no fees. [Note: exchange rate is 7 rmb per US dollar.] I soon bought 750 credits for $125. Overall, I would rate the endless nickel and dime fees as producing a pricy dating experience. Here are the current discounted prices:

Prices

50 credits for 28.99$; discount price - 19.99$

125 credits for 64.99$; discount price - 44.99$

250 credits for 99.99$; discount price - 69.99$

750 credits for 214.99$; discount price - 149.99$

After one month, I had developed a strong attraction to one of the women. We shared a lot of personal history and arrived at the point when we were ready to meet. I commend the designers of this site for providing a safe mode whereby women have a safety net when it comes to dating. I vigorously oppose, however, the requirement that a man must have spent 3000 credits on a woman before he (with her permission) could discover her email address or phone number. My Chinese gf and I were ready to take this step after having spent 525 credits. At this point, we had nearly five hours of sustained chatting, and I wanted to introduce my gf to some of my short stories (since I am a writer and publisher). This was impossible. So I began to initiate strategies for giving my gf my private email address. The software successfully blocked all my attempts. In effect, therefore, this dating site requires that I spend $428 on my gf before I could give her my email address. Gasp! This can now be seen as a pricy experience. Be forewarned. The managers of this site intend to pick your pocket even if you don't succeed in making a love match.

At just this point, I received a racy email for two different ladies: Lishuang Wu, 33 [ #20780923] and Lu Lu, 39 [ #20038826]. Here was the content:

We can try all the [sex] possitions together, and we will cuuum so many times together, we will have so much pleasure together too. That would be a wonderful life, do you think so? [The deliberate misspellings of sexy words is calculated to avoid blocking out such words by the software.]

What caused me alarm is that both of the women used the exact same words, including the same spelling and grammatical errors. This requires some explanation, don't you think?

Explanation #1: Did LW [abbr. For Lishuang Wu] copy from LL [abbr. For Lu Lu]? Did LL copy from LW? Not likely. Neither woman had visual access to what the other was typing. All chatroom conversations are "private."

Explanation #2: Both LW and LL are living in Beijing. Perhaps they are good friends. Perhaps they decided to work on their dating site together in the same place. Perhaps LW wrote the text, read it to her friend, LL, and her friend asked to borrow it. So LW copied her text in an email and sent it to LL. LL then opened the email and copied and pasted LW's text into her chatroom. What neither of them noticed, however, is that both of them were sending their shared message to the same person, namely me [aLong]. Explanation #2 is very conjectural. What is nearly impossible to contemplate is the improbability that they were independently responding to my chatroom input AT THE SAME TIME.

Explanation #3: Did both LW and LL share the same list of 20 or 30 chatroom responses? If so, this could explain how the word-for-word text was offered to me by two women who did not know each other and surely did not work side-by-side. The directors of some dating chatrooms do deliberately circulate sample responses to their female clients. In other instances, the women themselves create their own lists by visiting other dating sites. Even if such lists were in use, however, it would be highly unlikely that two women operating independently would somehow select to send me the identical same response at approximately the same time [plus or minus 30 minutes].

Explanation #4: Does https://lovingfeel.com hire women or men as paid "avatars" who stimulate chatroom exchanges by maintaining 3 to 8 female profiles at the same time? Dating sites who engage in this practice must, by law, alert their clients that such "avatars" are in play. I have not found any such admission on the part of https://lovingfeel.com. But let us allow, for the sake of argument, that https://lovingfeel.com was willing to work outside the law and that one such "avatar" hired by them was assigned both Lishuang Wu, 33 [ 20780923] and Lu Lu, 39 [ 20038826] as their "fake identities." The directors of https://lovingfeel.com could claim that both of these women have "verified identities" at some point, but, for one reason or the other, they left https://lovingfeel.com. Rather than deleting their inactive identities, the directors of https://lovingfeel.com might have decided that it would be in their interest to assign such inactive "identities" to a hired avatar who worked behind the scenes to maintain their pricy communications with "fake women hiding behind verified identities."

If one looks at the words sent to me, it is clear that LW and LL were intent upon my "sexual arousal." If you read my own previous comments to both of these women, you will not find me so orientated. Hence, since many dating sites do hire "avatars" to promote the sexual stimulation of their male clients, it is not unthinkable that https://lovingfeel.com might be tempted to do the same.

It is furthermore quite possible that a lazy avatar would write a stimulating text for one client and then turn around and use it for three or more other clients as well. Since the men have no way of seeing texts written to persons other than themselves, this lazy "cut and paste" shortcut would never be noticed. However, a lazy avatar who was assigned both Lishuang Wu, 33 [ 20780923] and Lu Lu, 39 [ 20038826] as his "fake identities" might carelessly have sent the same identical words to dozens of their suitors and, in the process, they might have lost track of the fact that the same erotic words were being inadvertently sent to me [aLong] by two unrelated women: LW and LL.

I CAUGHT YOU CHEATING!

As it turns out, I am a professional investigator. I have spent four years investigating fraudulent practices used by dating sites, and I have published two books designed to give the average online dater the tools for detecting various forms of fraud and protecting themselves there from. In interested, go to True Confessions = payhip.com/b/DwJg or Mary Schuster Sex Slave = https://payhip.com/b/QinS

I came to https://lovingfeel.com with the hope of having a pleasant experience in meeting, in understanding, and in dating Chinese women. I am bitterly disappointed in finding that fraudulent practices have severely worn down my trust. Based upon my own personal experiences, I would judge that only 20% of the women's profiles are legitimate and are being operated by the woman shown in the profile. My two favorite women were "online" in the chatroom ten hours every day. If they weren't talking to me, then I must presume that they were communicating with other men. This was the case even when one of these women assured me that I was her "exclusive gf" and that she spent her days "constantly thinking of me." Hence, even among the 20%, there is the suspicion that the women are not playing with a full deck of cards. My suspicion is that the management of https://lovingfeel.com offers women a portion of the fees being paid by the men; hence, even the "honest women" are being systematically corrupted by the system in place. Needless to say, I was not able to confirm this.

When I did challenge particular women to post a pic of themselves holding a sign saying "aLong Woda Baobei" [aLong is my treasure]. This msg was in Mandarin so as to make it invisible to 95% of the men seeing it. Even my special gf was unwilling to do this as a favor for me; hence, I leave it to my readers to draw their own conclusions.

Visitors by Country [from HypeStat.com].

Users% Pageviews% Rank

United States 27.0% 19.9% 51983

India 4.8% 9.0% 74668

France 3.9% 3.9% 46753

Brazil 3.6% 19.7% 33352

Ethiopia 2.3% 1.1% 5023

Bangladesh 1.7% 1.0% 14761

Algeria 1.2% 1.0% 19178

Indonesia 1.1% 0.7% 50106

Egypt 1.0% 1.5% 36003

Uganda 1.0% 1.3% 4450

South Africa 0.9% 0.3% 59315

Sri Lanka 0.9% 0.6% 11351

Tanzania 0.7% 0.7% 7291

Ghana 0.7% 1.0% 5456

Conclusion: When I did searches for women, I chose "Chinese women" and received more than 20,000 hits. 96% of my emails received were from women in China. Yet, in the "Visitors by Country" table above, no visitors from China are even listed (meaning it is less than 1%). Something is wrong here. At least 48% of the visitors to this site should be located in China. But clearly they are not. The only way to explain this is to conclude that the vast majority of "certified women" are listed as being from China, but, in fact, they are not. They are from the USA or from India. This helps me understand why my two favorite Chinese women used and understood American slang so well. They WERE, in fact, Americans disguising themselves as "Chinese women." I am living in Shanghai. I am sensitive to how careful an American must be when using English slang. I have a Chinese woman teaching me Mandarin who professionally functions to train Chinese teachers to teach English at the high school level. Her use and understanding of American slang is very limited.

Better yet! Try using some Mandarin words in the chatroom. I dare you. Try asking your Chinese gf how to say "telescope" or "raining cats and dogs" in Mandarin. YOU WILL BE DISAPPOINTED.

Sincerely,

Aaron, Online Investigator of Fraudulent Dating Sites

My email = *******@ChurchonFire.net

PS: I just now did a Google search and found a site that provides a balanced and trustworthy confirmation of the scam being perpetrated by the directors: "LovingFeel.com Admits To Creating Fake Profiles & Deceptions Exposed In This Review."

Lovingfeel.Com - Info

lovingfeel.com receives about 10,859 unique visitors and 36,921 (3.40 per visitor) page views per day which should earn about $118.07/day from advertising revenue. Estimated site value is $48,181.59. According to Alexa Traffic Rank lovingfeel.com is ranked number 98,115 in the world and 0.00064% of global Internet users visit it. Site is hosted in United States and links to network IP address 104. 19. 177. 131. This server supports HTTPS and HTTP/2 [from HypeStat.com].

Email = *******@ChurchonFire.net I just now did a Google search and found a site that provides a balanced and trustworthy investigation of the scam being perpetrated by the directors: "LovingFeel.com Admits To Creating Fake Profiles & Deceptions Exposed In This Review."

Sincerely,

Aaron Milavec

3.2K Views
7/10/18

On the day when everything went wrong in my Fidelity Investment Account, I called the trading desk and asked Frank, "Can I now officially place trades today as a day trader?" He said, "Yes." I told him what I planned to do, and he said, "Go ahead."

With confidence, then, I went ahead and made two day trades in BZUN. Next day I was hit with a $32,748 day trader call. I called the trader desk and explained that I did not have $33k cash to liquidate this call. Sure enough, Frank had made a serious error. The money was in the account, but $600 had not yet cleared. Hence, on the morning I spoke to Frank, only $24,900 was available in my account. Note: $25,000 is required for day trader status.

The trading desk agreed (they listened to the recorded conversation I had with Frank)--Frank had made an error. They also explained that once the day trader call was posted, it could not be withdrawn. Fidelity offered me 25 free trades (worth $200). I asked Fidelity to invest $33k into my account for two days so as to meet the call. Fidelity explained that federal regulations do not allow them to do this. So I asked for 50 free trades (worth $400) to partially compensate for Frank's bad judgment. After much hesitation, Fidelity finally agreed.

In all these exchanges, I never once felt that anyone on the trading desk was taking my side and actively thinking in the direction of providing a solution. This is what hurt. They politely gave the information I asked for, but never once expressed regret for the financial suffering that Frank's bad info had caused. Nor did they express any concern that I was losing faith in the advice that the trader's desk was offering me. What were they not telling me?

On two other occasions, I was given bad info by Fidelity staff. On these occasions as well, I ended up saying, "I have no confidence that you are working with me to find a solution. You give me only the information that I ask for and then spend an enormous amount of energy trying to justify the treatment that I received."

All in all, I spent over ten hours in voice and text exchanges with Fidelity staff (advisors and supervisors). It was an enormous waste of time. Nixon brought the word "stone-walling" into the American vocabulary. I would say that the Fidelity staff exhibits stonewalling. Empathy is practically non-existent.

FlirtHookUp
131K Views
1/4/16

I signed up for one-month of dating services with flirthookup.com on 23 Dec 2015. I filled out my profile and wrote emails to a dozen of the women who viewed me.

No returns.

So I did a picture check using google images. The results were depressing.

#1 sweetbaby1974 and her pic are listed as living in Cincinnati (my town), but on pof.com, the same combo is listed for East Brewton, Alabama. There were ten other sites that displayed the same pic, some in the UK. Does sweetbaby keep all these sites active? Not likely. No reply from her even though she did go online regularly.

#2 NoreenFiles634 and her pic are listed for Covington, KY (near Cinci), but the same combo is listed for Salt Lake City on xmeeting.com. Her age goes from 42 to 34. Does Noreen keep both sites active because she travels back and forth? Unlikely. No reply from her even though she did go online regularly.

Then I used FlirtHookUp and scam as Google search words. The Scambook site headed up the list: Information about FlirtHookUp was first submitted to Scambook on Jan 08,2013. Since then the page has accumulated 83 consumer complaints. On average users reported $44.66 of damages.

I called *******473 on 04 Jan 2016 and explained my complaint. Ozzie offered to reduce my bill from $59.95 to $29.95 (one-month rental). I was charged for three-months even though I had registered online for one month only. I agreed to the cut-back but explained that I would take this issue up with my credit card company in order to have a full refund. Ozzie then reluctantly offered me a full refund. I accepted and requested an email confirmation:

Dear Valued Customer,

A refund has been issued to your account in the amount of $59.95 for the membership to FlirtHookup.com. Please allow 10-15 business days for the refund to post to your account. We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.

If you have any questions regarding this matter please contact our 24 hour Customer Service Center at *******714 FREE or *******864.

Your cancellation of further billing is confirmed.

Thank you,

Customer Service
OA4067

9/10/15

Tried match.com. Then went to echemistry.com. Finally discovered ascendinghearts.com.

What a joy! No more superficial profiles. Here the women express their inner journey, and they are interested in my own. Cost is one-half of other sites; yet, the value is five times better.

I wish I had come here first.

*******@yahoo.com

Aaron Has Earned 15 Votes

Aaron M.'s review of Fidelity earned 4 Very Helpful votes

Aaron M.'s review of AscendingHearts earned a Very Helpful vote

Aaron M.'s review of FlirtHookUp earned 10 Very Helpful votes

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