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Intertel Questions & Answers

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Here’s what consumers have asked with answers from Intertel staff and previous consumers.

9 questions answered
11% answered in 1 day
Answer:

Hi James. Yes, we can check whether spyware is installed on your phone. The first thing we'd ask you is what make/model phone it is, and that is because some phone types are impervious to spyware (for example, "cheapie" non-smartphones). Whether or not you need to send the phone to us depends entirely on what you need us to do. Basically, just to tell you whether you have spyware installed and then to remove that spyware wouldn't require us to physically have the phone in our hands. We can use remote access software like Team Viewer to remotely access your phone, examine it and take appropriate action to secure it. This usually takes no longer than 15-30 minutes. We also wouldn't necessarily need the phone if you wanted us to investigate any discovered spyware. We could remotely identify the spyware, determine when and how it was installed, what data it may have had access to, where any compromised data may have been sent to, and more. This could take well over an hour depending on exactly what is discovered. If, however, you wanted the phone examined so that evidence of the use of spyware could be used in civil or criminal action against those responsible then we'd need the phone. A proper chain of custody would need to be established, and forensically sound methods would be used in handling and examining the phone, identifying, acquiring and preserving digital evidence, analyzing that evidence and arriving at our conclusions. Normally, this sort of examination will take 2-3 days, but can be expedited if a report is required urgently for court. You're welcome to email debug [at] intertel [dot] co [dot] za for more information or give us a call on 0861262275.

By Brett P., Managing Director
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Answer:

Every active cellphone number can be traced back to the person or persona (if not an actual person) to whom the SIM card was registered. Every SIM card that is in use on our mobile networks must be registered in terms of the RICA Act or it would not be able to make use of the cellular network at all (except to call 112 emergency services and possibly the network operator's customer care number). "Illegal SIM cards", or ones that are not registered to anyone at all, are a fallacy. They cannot be used on our networks. All SIM cards will be registered to someone. That isn't to say that all SIM cards are registered using the bona fides of the person that is actually using that SIM card. "Already registered" SIM cards can be borrowed, stolen, found or otherwise obtained from people that we have access to; or they can be bought for less then R100 from many street vendors and cell phone shops. Times are tough and strangers could even be approached with a reasonable cash offer to either sell their SIM card or to register one in their name. Then there's the RICA terminals themselves and the people who have access to them. I've registered a number of SIM cards and on a few occasions I wasn't even asked for documentation - I was simply asked for my name, ID number and address - all of which I gave verbally despite having had the required documents with me. Criminals would probably make approaches to people with access to those terminals and could have SIM cards registered using bogus or stolen identities that would be virtually (but not entirely) untraceable. You can check phone number ownership using various databases here: https://www.intertel.co.za/trace - the price is between R100 and R350 depending on the source, and you'd get at least the person's name, an identifier (like passport number, date of birth or ID number) and an address. If that info turns out to be outdated or false then one could look at tracking the location of the number or linking other handsets, SIM cards and numbers with the one in question to find a point of entry for an investigation. There's much that can be done, but tracing ownership is the first (and cheapest) step.

By Brett P., Managing Director
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Answer:

Yes, its possible to do. Get in contact with our offices and someone can assist you.

By Brett P., Managing Director
Answer:

Tracking is provided by an external service provider. We can guarantee that they'll undertake the tracking you require. We obviously can't guarantee that any action you or others wish to take based on any tracking results will be successful. Is that what you meant?

By Brett P., Managing Director
Answer:

Hi George, you're welcome to send me the information that you have and i'll assess the cost. Email brett@intertelgroup.com.

By Brett P., Managing Director
Answer:

Yes, it is normal considering the turnaround time is advertised as 48 hours and the weekend took up 2 of those days.

By Brett P., Managing Director
Answer:

Yes, it is normal considering the turnaround time is advertised as 48 hours and the weekend took up 2 of those days.

By Brett P., Managing Director
Answer:

Yes, certainly. Email the information you have regarding the "someone" in question to trace@intertel.co.za and we'll assess whether there is sufficient information to identify and trace the person.

By Brett P., Managing Director
Answer:

Hi Amy, There are a number of ways to trace emails back to the original sender. Not enough is known about your specific situation to offer any concrete advice, but here's a general guide (assuming that you are based in South Africa): 1. If the emails are being sent from a local email address (. co.za,. org.za,. ac.za,. za.net,. gov.za, etc), and (i) if the nature of the communication or content of the messages constitutes harassment, stalking or bullying then (a) exercise your rights in terms of the Protection from Harassment Act and apply for an interim protection order (b) the Court can direct the email service provider to furnish the senders particulars in terms of Regulation 7 (ii) if the emails are of such as nature that they're likely to impair your dignity or cause serious damage to your reputation then (a) you may be able to open a case of crimen injuria or criminal defamation against the sender (b) you could then have the email service provider subpoena'd in terms of Section 205 of the Criminal Procedure Act (iii) Similarly, if the emails are designed to intimidate you or are part of an effort to extort or blackmail you then (a) opening a police case would be the best option. The police will be able to advise which charges are most appropriate. (b) as above the senders details could be obtained by means of a Section 205 subpoena 2. If the emails are being sent from a foreign email address, including gmail.com, yahoo.com, hotmail.com, etc, and (i) if the content or the sending of the emails would constitute a criminal offense in the email service provider's jurisdiction then (a) open a police case locally and request assistance through a Mutual Legal Assistance or other Treaty with that country (if applicable) or (b) open a police case locally and request assistance through Interpol (via the Interpol Liaison office in South Africa) (ii) if the emails are a violation of the email services providers T&C's, the country's common or other law then (a) try a Freedom of Information Act (or similar) application for as much information as the email service provider is willing to provide and (b) contact a lawyer in that jurisdiction to petition the Court for a subpoena, court order or search warrant as appropriate to get the rest 3. If you'd prefer to have professionals handle it for you then get in touch with us and we'll assess your situation and circumstances to find the best solution for you. Regards, Angela (angela@intertel.co.za)

By Brett P., Managing Director

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